Small SchoolsTDRI

This is an explainer video about schools that are small. In the video it is said that 15,000 or around half of all schools in Thailand have less than 120 students and are considered small. Research suggests that students in small schools perform worse than those in bigger schools. In this explainer video, it is going to discuss what the possible reasons are for this problem on schools being small. This video will also discuss some solutions that may be of help to this problem. In this short explainer video there are going to be mini clip art drawings that would help you understand and learn why schools are small and what the possible solutions could be done to this kind of problem. The video will also discuss about the research they have done on this topic. So what are you waiting for? Press play and enjoy this explainer video!

Script & Storyboard
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15,000 or around half of all schools in Thailand have less than 120 students and are considered small. Research suggests that students in small schools perform worse than those in bigger schools.
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Possible reasons for this disadvantage are that 60% of small schools have less than 1 teacher per grade, Small schools lack specialized teachers for many subjects and small schools have small budgets for activities, building maintenance and materials.
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One solution is to share resources, especially teachers. Schools located within one area can form networks to share teachers by pooling students of one grade together.
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The Kanjan model in Loei Province, Thailand is one example. There were 4 schools located within 10 Kilometers from each other. Each school has only 3 teachers to cover 8 grades, from pre-primary 1 to primary 6.
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In 2011, the schools formed a network to share teachers by pooling students. Each school is now responsible for 2 grades and each has 3 teachers. The local authorities provide free transportation for students who need to travel.
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The outcomes were positive. Students in the same age group form bigger classes and partake in more activities and knowledge exchange. Teachers develop higher quality content and activities for students as they now concentrate on one grade only.
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The success of the Kanjan project suggests that schools should aim to end up with at least 1 teacher per grade. The class size should not be larger than 40 students and the network should not be exceed 500 students.
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Students and teachers should be provided with free transportation with insurance. Networks should be formed within the same sub-districts in line with their funding body and schools should not be located further than 10 kilometers from each other. Schools in remote locations need to be dealt with differently.
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The key to success is involving as many stakeholders as possible in the consensus building process. Interview parents on the trade-off between extra travel time and higher school quality. Organize community meetings to create understanding and identify what each stakeholder can contribute to the network and create an environment for students in different schools to meet Before the network is formed.
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Please use the comment section below to let us know what you think and if you see an opportunity in your area to form a network within other schools in the area. Thank you for watching!
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